PolitiFact

Fact-Checking, Politics on the Internet

The Poynter Institute. (2019). PolitiFact [website]. Retrieved from https://politifact.com.

Description: This nonprofit-owned investigative team rates political statements for accuracy based on their independent news expertise and then awards them a score on a “truthometer.”

Why I trust it: Politifact’s core values include: thorough reporting, independence, transparency, and fairness. PolitiFact does not accept donations from political parties, elected officials, candidates seeking public office, or anonymous sources.

Use: This organization has only been fact-checking since 2007, but it has since gained a reputation for unbiased investigation into the truth (or lack thereof) of political statements. Use it to gain some perspective on political entities on all sides.

Access: Politifact is free for use through a preferred internet browser from any computer in the United States, and beyond.

American fact finder

Fact-Checking

U.S. Census Bureau. (2019.) American fact finder advanced search. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t.

Description: This is a government-funded database of community facts, from population data, to school district data, to data on income.

Why I trust it: It’s just the data—plain and simple.

Use: Fact check local news by popping any data listed in a local news article into the search bar to see if it matches up or if the sentence is worded to mislead or paint the data in an alternative light.

Access: The American Fact Finder is free for use through a preferred internet browser from any computer in the United States, and beyond.

Tin eye

Fact-Checking, Fake News, Scams & Hoaxes

TinEye. (2019). Reverse image search [search engine]. Retrieved from https://tineye.com.

Description: This reverse image search accesses a multibillion index of web images to determine from where an image originates and locate/track modified versions.

Use: Wondering if that news article is a hoax? Try reverse searching any images within the article to find their true origins (and debunk that hoax!).

Access: As of now, TinEye is free for use through a preferred internet browser from any computer in the United States, and beyond.

Snopes

Fact-Checking, Fake News, Scams & Hoaxes

Snopes. (2019). Fact check [website]. Retrieved from https://snopes.com/fact-check.

Description: Snopes’ fact checking feature offers an archive of investigated rumors and questionable claims.

Why I trust it: The oldest and largest online fact-checking site, Snopes’ contextualized analysis uses evidence-based practices to fact-check the media. The company has been independently verified by the International Fact Checking Network, and, in the spirit of truth-seeking, it invites skepticism and challengers. The fact-checkers attempt to contact sources for interviews and seek out supporting information. They consult experts, and each fact-check travels through multiple staffers.

Use: Reading something you suspect could be fake? Pop keywords into the search bar to see if it’s been investigated.

Access: Users can access this column using a preferred internet browser from any computer in the United States, and beyond.

Politico

Fact-Checking, Politics on the Internet

Politico. (2019). Is it true? A fake news database [website]. Retreived from https://www.politico.com/interactives/2018/is-this-true.

Description: People send in suspected hoaxes, doctored images, and fake websites. Then, Politico’s team works to determine the truth.

Why I trust it: Politico’s mission is to provide its audience with accurate, nonpartisan information. In 2012, the Poynter Institute found that about the same percentage of Politico readers identify as democrat as do those that identify as republican.

Use: Reading something you suspect could be fake? Pop keywords into this Politico database to see if it’s been investigated. If not, visit the “about the project” link for a submission form.

Access: Users can access this column using a preferred internet browser from any computer in the United States, and beyond.

Fact checker

Fact-Checking

Kessler, G. (2019). Fact checker: The truth behind the rhetoric [column]. Retrieved from https://washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker.  

Description: This column, based on sound news media principles, is authored by professional fact checker Glenn Kessler and his colleagues Salvador Rizzo and Meg Kelly. Its goal is to fact check the statements of political figures and weed through political rhetoric. The authors also investigate answers to questions submitted by readers.

Why I trust it: Glenn Kessler is an award-winning journalist whose career spans decades. His fact-checking team analyzes political statements on both the left and right, and they do so without inserting opinion. The column appears in the national-news section of The Post, seperate from the editorial or opinion sections. Also, members of the team are not permitted to engage in partisan political activity or make contributions to candidates or advocacy organizations.

Use: Use this resource to fill in missing context in political statements and get a more comprehensive, unbiased picture of topics mentioned by politicians.

Access: Users can access this column using a preferred internet browser from any computer in the United States, and beyond.

Hudson’s Washington news media contacts guide

Fact-Checking, Fake News, News & the Internet

Grey House Publishing. (2019). Hudson’s Washington news media contacts guide. Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/2166135.

Description: This periodical reference has been published for over 50 years and offers contact information for over 4,000 key media contacts.

Why I trust it: This is a periodical publication, with new, updated editions available annually. It includes media contact information that one would not be able to find on the internet.

Use: Have a question about an article you are reading? See if the author’s contact information—or the contact information of a cited source— is available through this resource.

Access: This resource is available through several university library systems. If it’s not available at your library, try requesting it through an inter-library loan.

The Chicago guide to fact-checking

Fact-Checking

Borel, B. (2016). The Chicago guide to fact-checking. Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1043503275.

Description: This Chicago guide offers tools and best practices for fact checking across multiple forms of media.

Why I trust it: This guide was published by the same company that publishes the Chicago Manual of Style, and it draws on the expertise of over 200 professional writers, editors, and fact-checkers. The book’s editor, Brooke Borel, is a former research editor at Science Illustrated and a former fact checker at Quanta. She also teaches science communication workshops at New York University.

Use: Use this manual to beef up your web fact-checking skills. You’ll find numerous strategies to fact-check across multiple forms of media. You’ll also find, at the end of the book, 20 full pages of references organized by chapter.

Access: This title is accessible in-library through the University at Albany Libraries reference collection under call number ZA3075 .B67 2016. You can also request this title through the New York Public Libr

Not real news

Fact-Checking, Fake News

The Associated Press (2019). Not real news [column]. Retrieved from https://www.apnews.com/NotRealNews.

Description: This weekly Associated Press column offers an overview and fact-check of the top viral social media content.

Why I trust it: The Associated Press is a not-for-profit news producer in existence for over 150 years. It has won over 50 Pulitzer Prizes, and its content is trusted and reproduced by newspapers world-wide.

Use: Stay “on top of the news” by reading this column each week.

Access: Users can access this column using a preferred internet browser from any computer in the United States, and beyond.

Opposing viewpoints in context

Current Issues, Fact-Checking, Politics on the Internet

Gale. (2019). Opposing viewpoints in context [database]. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com.libproxy.albany.edu/ps/start.do?p=OVIC&u=albanyu.

Description: This database is a collection of research-based entries covering current issues. It approaches the information in a pro/con format and includes articles, maps, infographics, and more.

Why I trust it: For 65 years, Gale has provided libraries and other educational institutions with databases on a variety of subjects. The publishing company uses a world-wide network of scholars to curate and review its content.

Use: When you hear or read about a controversial current issue or event, you can use this database to understand major points on both sides of the topic.

Access: You can access this database through the University at Albany Libraries. If you are a current student, faculty, or staff member, you can proxy into the server using your UAlbany ID. Otherwise, you can visit one of the library buildings and use a guest computer pass to access the database.